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FNFN LAND GUARDIANS

The FNFN Land Guardians are our "eyes and ears" on the ground, increasing our presence on the land, participating in land and resource management, including habitat recovery and restoration, and supporting land-based cultural activities.

 

FNFN LIARD BASIN MONITORING INITIATIVE YEAR 1 COMMUNITY SUMMARY REPORT

In 2018, the FNFN Lands released our Community Summary on our State of Knowledge work conducted through the Liard Basin Monitoring Initiative project in year 1. The LBMI project was a 3 year pilot initiative led by FNFN to develop a cumulative effects monitoring program for the Liard Watershed based on FNFN cultural and ecological values. Please contact the Lands Department at 1-250-774-6313 if you would like a copy of the full Year 1 State of Knowledge Report.

 
 

FORT NELSON FIRST NATION MEDZIH ACTION PLAN TO PREVENT LOSS OF BOREAL CARIBOU IN BC

In 2018, Fort Nelson First Nation (FNFN) released a Medzih (boreal caribou) Action Plan to address the emergency conditions that have led to the rapid decline of this culturally important animal in BC. The Medzih Action Plan (MAP) delivers recovery actions for boreal caribou habitat within the Liard watershed in northeastern British Columbia.

The MAP is the first, and so far only, recovery plan in BC to spatially identify and protect critical habitat for boreal caribou, a critically imperiled and iconic species that once occurred in large numbers in FNFN’s territory.

For more information about the Medzih Action Plan contact katherine.wolfenden@fnnation.ca.
Phone: 1-250-774-7257

 
 

IMAGINE THE FIRE...AS A FORCE FOR GOOD

The relationship between Dene people and fire is complex and dates back thousands of years. The practice lives on to this day, including the use of fire for:

  • Supporting the growth of important plants

  • Maintaining habitat and good hunting areas

  • Keeping a clean camp/village and averting wildfire 

  • Ceremony - giving thanks and honouring the ancestors

​Prescribed fire is a vital Indigenous practice that must be continued and passed down to future generations. At one time,  every one of our families participated in controlled burning to manage the land and ensure healthy habitat for wildlife. Fire is a necessity for the land and our culture. In the Dene Fire Project, elders told us the art of tending fire should be taught at a young age and fire has always been a serious and respected art to the Dene people. Watch this CBC documentary for more information about the Dene Fire Project:  
 https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/2392539513/​

 
 

T: 250.774.6313

F: 250-774-6317

2028 Kennay-Yah Rd
RR1 Mile 295 Alaska Highway
Fort Nelson, BC  V0C 1R0

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